McGregor vs Khabib Live Stream

Khabib Nurmagomedov vs Conor McGregor: Fight time, TV channel, live stream and full card for UFC 229
The 30-year-old Irishman has not fought since taking the lightweight crown against Eddie Alvarez in November 2015 – but is back to face bruising Russian Khabib Nurmagomedov.
When is Khabib Nurmagomedov vs Conor McGregor?
Headlining UFC 229, the fight will take place on October 6.

The prelims get going around 11pm UK time, before the main event around 4am.

Things are being held at the impressive T-Mobile Arena in Las Vegas.
What TV channel is UFC 229 on and can I live stream it?
BT Sport hold the exclusive rights to UFC in the UK and Ireland until December this year.

Subscribers will be able to watch all the action online and via the BT Sport app, which is available on Google Play, the App Store and Windows 10 devices.

Alternatively, you can follow all of the action on our dedicated SunSport LIVE BLOG
Who is on the undercard?
Early Prelims
Ryan LaFlare vs Tony Martin (welterweight)

Gray Maynard vs Nik Lentz (lightweight)

Scott Holtzman vs Alan Patrick (lightweight)

Lina Lansberg vs Yana Kunitskaya (bantamweight)

FS1 Prelims
Aspen Ladd vs Tonya Evinger (bantamweight)

Sergio Pettis vs Jussier Formiga (flyweight)

Sean O’Malley vs Jose Quinonez (bantamweight)

Main card
Michelle Waterson vs Felice Herrig (strawweight)

Derrick Lewis vs Alexander Volkov (heavyweight)

Ovince Saint Preux vs Dominick Reyes (light heavyweight)

Tony Ferguson vs Anthony Pettis (lightweight)

Khabib Nurmagomedov vs Conor McGregor (lightweight)
What have the fighters said?
McGregor: “I came back for the love of this to come and shut this man up—a little rat, a little weasel, a little man in groups.

“I have met many of them during the years but when it gets hot, he scours away. I came back for the love of war and I am going to truly, truly love putting a bad beating on this little glass jaw rat.”

Nurmagomedov: “How is he going to fight with me for 25 minutes? This is not Nate Diaz, this is not Eddie Alvarez or Jose Aldo.

“This is a completely different fighter. If you want to stop me, you have to kill me. This guy will have to kill me.”

FIFA World Cup 2018 Closing Ceremony

World Cup final LIVE: France vs. Croatia and closing ceremony.Croatia beat England and France overcame Belgium, now they face off to become world champions. It’s Croatia’s first ever World Cup final, while France are looking to land their second trophy after success in 1998.

They don’t make them like Olivier Giroud and Mario Mandzukic these days. Or rather, they try not to.

World Cup 2018 has been utterly dominated by European nations, who contributed 11 of the 16 second-round sides, six of the eight quarterfinal teams, all four semifinalists and therefore, of course, both France and Croatia in Sunday’s final. While tactical sophistication is frequently (and unfairly) cited as the main strength of European nations, as compared to sides from other continents, realistically their greater advantage is simply their industrialisation of youth coaching, a process has resulted in the production of a huge number of top-level footballers.

In fairness, Croatia are something of an exception to the rule. But if France lift the Jules Rimet Trophy on Sunday, the primary reason will be — like with Spain in 2010 and Germany four years ago — the academies that have provided them with the most impressive pool of talent around, rather than their manager’s tactical plan.

There is, however, one type of footballer that European academies are not producing: the traditional striker.

Mandzukic’s place up front for Croatia was never in doubt, but he plays a similar role as Giroud, battling against opposition centre-backs and providing a central pivot for the likes of Ivan Perisic and Ante Rebic to feed off; this division of duties allows the latter pair to concentrate on using their speed in the channels. Mandzukic has scored two goals in Russia this summer: a gloriously scrappy opener against Denmark and the extra-time winner against England. It is two more goals than Giroud has managed in this tournament and means Mandzukic has now scored one more international goal than his French counterpart overall, 32-31.

There are two other aspects that link Giroud and Mandzukic. First, they’re extremely hard-working despite simply not being natural athletes. Giroud, while a physically impressive figure, always appears exhausted after closing down opponents, as if the mere concept of running is something of an unexpected task. Mandzukic, meanwhile, moves somewhat awkwardly and has repeatedly suffered from cramp throughout this tournament. That said, his work rate throughout his top-level career has been incredible at times. At Bayern, he was a one-man pressing machine, and with Juventus, he seemingly manages to play left-wing and centre-forward simultaneously.

Second, both are genuinely outstanding footballers in a technical sense, capable of spectacular, acrobatic goals. For Giroud’s scorpion kick against Crystal Palace on the first day of 2017, see Mandzukic’s incredible overhead kick in the Champions League final against Real Madrid a few months later. They might be considered target men in the modern era, but they’re not simply aerial threats who batter opponents with strength; they’re skillful, intelligent centre-forwards with imagination and creativity to rival slicker, quicker players. They merely have a different body shape.
Sure enough, neither rose through academies. Both were overlooked by bigger clubs during their formative years and made their debuts, both when 19 back in 2005-06, in their nation’s respective second divisions. Giroud was at Grenoble, later dropping down to the third tier on loan, while Mandzukic started out in the Croatian second division with Marsonia.

These tall, strong strikers aren’t what big clubs generally look for from youngsters, so they endured a gradual rise to the top. It took Giroud until 2010, at the age of 24, for his first taste of Ligue 1 action; and while Mandzukic had already been playing in the Croatian top flight by that age, he moved to a top league with Wolfsburg at the same age. Giroud then had two years with Montpellier, winning the 2011-12 Ligue 1 Golden Boot and earning a move to Arsenal, while Mandzukic had two years with Wolfsburg, jointly winning the Euro 2012 Golden Boot and earning a move to Bayern Munich.

Since then, both have regularly been overlooked despite impressive levels of consistency. Arsenal had been eternally attempting to move on from Giroud and basing their side around quicker, more dynamic centre-forwards. Somehow, the France No. 9 always battled back and proved his worth, until finally accepting his fate and moving to Chelsea in January — a transfer made partly to secure his place at this tournament.

Similarly, Mandzukic was sidelined at Bayern Munich after the arrival of Robert Lewandowski, more of an all-rounder, before moving on to Atletico Madrid and then Juventus. Chelsea and Juventus seem good fits for Giroud and Mandzukic right now: clubs concerned with substance rather than style.

Also a good fit for both? International football. Whereas top-level club sides demand speed and movement from their forwards, at international tournaments the football is much simpler, the play much slower and the defences deeper. Therefore, stand-out centre-forwards are often more static. Giroud is the perfect example: Supporters and neutrals alike were salivating at the prospect of France using a mobile, energetic front trio of Kylian Mbappe, Ousmane Dembele and Antoine Griezmann, but that type of fluid, free-flowing forward line always looks better on paper than it works on the pitch. Giroud’s introduction against Australia provided someone who could play with his back to goal, serving on-rushing players and bringing more depth to their play.
Still, the World Cup remains football’s most revered prize, and these two will lead the line in football’s biggest game. The likes of Timo Werner, Sergio Aguero, Gabriel Jesus, Harry Kane, Romelu Lukaku and the other younger, more “modern” strikers have been eliminated, but Giroud and Mandzukic are still present: the great throwbacks who are always happy to play the long game.

World Cup Final 2018

MOSCOW – View Sunday’s World Cup final the way most folks under the age of 30 consume sports — or so we’re told — and it’s entirely one-sided. When it comes to social media, viral highlight videos, cross-pollination with other celebrities, commercial endorsements and overall eyeball-catching power, it’s over before it has even begun.

France wins.

The entire Croatia starting XI has only a few million Instagram followers more than France midfielder Paul Pogba alone. Some of them don’t even have blue check marks (gasp!), while others don’t have accounts at all (double gasp!).

View the match from a different vantage point — pedigree — and it’s thoroughbreds versus wild horses who escaped to the hills. From Pogba to Antoine Griezmann to Raphael Varane to Kylian Mbappe, most of these French players have been under the spotlight since they were pre-teens. This World Cup final, for them, is destiny, part of their road map.

France are probably the deepest, most talented squad at Russia 2018 and there is a sense of both entitlement and expectation about their run to the final. They pretty much did it without breaking a sweat, at each turn doing just enough to dispatch the opposition, knowing they could raise their game at any moment. In many games, it felt like playing one-on-one basketball with a big brother who let you keep the score close but who — you just knew — could turn it on at will if he so chose.

Croatia? Talk about ugly ducklings. Mario Mandzukic has the distinction of being rejected by both Pep Guardiola and Diego Simeone. Dejan Lovren, despite reaching the Champions League final with Liverpool in May, is routinely derided (often unfairly) as an accident waiting to happen. In February, Domagoj Vida was sent off after just 16 minutes of his Champions League debut for new club Besiktas.

Captain Luka Modric is a legitimate superstar, who might be a Ballon d’Or candidate, but is also a guy who is hated by large chunks of the country for his role in an ugly affair of perjury, corruption and embezzlement. Two years ago, at Euro 2016, some Croatian fans, so incensed with their federation and some of their players, fired flares onto the pitch in an effort to get their own team kicked out of the competition.

France and Croatia meet in the World Cup final on Sunday. ESPN Illustration
Little has come easy for Croatia in Russia, either. Nikola Kalinic was sent home after he refused to come on as a substitute late in the opening group-stage match against Nigeria.

They also fell behind in each of their three knockout games and somehow clawed their way back, twice needing penalties and once extra time — Wednesday’s 2-1 victory against England — to advance.

The difference is just as stark when it comes to the two managers. Both Didier Deschamps and Zlatko Dalic were hard-tackling defensive midfielders who were at the 1998 World Cup. Except Deschamps, one of the best ever in his position, was on the pitch and helped France lift the trophy for the first time in their history. Dalic was in the stands as a spectator, having paid his own way.

Upon retirement, Deschamps immediately went on to manage wealthy clubs like Monaco, Juventus and Marseille before getting the France gig in 2012. Dalic, meanwhile, held assistant- and youth-coach jobs before working in Croatia, Albania and Saudi Arabia (at a newly created club), before finally getting some recognition in the United Arab Emirates. He became Croatia boss only last October and only with the proviso that he would be gone if he failed to qualify for the World Cup.

Look, Croatia are a talented side. It’s just that a country with a population smaller than metro Detroit will, out of necessity, field a team where A-list stars like Modric and Ivan Rakitic share a place in the starting lineup with lesser-known players, to put it kindly. Guys like Ivan Strinic, who was released by his club last month and has made only 31 league starts in the previous three seasons, and Ante Rebic, who has bounced around five clubs over the past five years.

France, on the other hand, have three of the five most expensive players in history and one of them, Ousmane Dembele, is likely to be on the bench. They also boast the Premier League Player of the Year from two seasons back, N’Golo Kante, and the most expensive signing in the history of Bayern Munich, Corentin Tolisso; he is also likely to start on the bench.

They also get the luxury of an extra day’s rest since their semifinal, a 1-0 win vs. Belgium, was on Tuesday. And they face a team that, if you add up the three extra-time exertions Croatia had to battle through, has effectively played an additional 90 minutes of football.

World Cup 2018 must-reads
– Make your ESPN FC Match Predictor picks!
– World Cup fixtures, results and coverage
– France favourites but don’t rule out Croatia
– ESPN FC TV: Leboeuf ‘not that confident’
– Who has the edge in the World Cup final?
– Pogba’s secret has been to keep it simple
– Project Russia: Has VAR been a success?
– Croatia have made the most unlikely run

At first glance, this might appear as one-sided on the pitch as it is in terms of hype, pedigree and name recognition. But lean in and look a bit closer.

For all their talent, France have played conservative, no-frills football throughout the tournament, in keeping with Deschamps’ mantra. Most of their goals have come on set pieces or counterattacks. They are a big team who have played with the humility of a small team, and that’s not a bad thing. However, if they go a goal down, it does make you wonder whether they can kick their performance into a higher gear.

Plus, there’s a psychological angle: Two years ago, at Euro 2016, France were heavily favored over Portugal in the final, yet they somehow contrived to throw it away on home soil. Sometimes demons from our past come back to haunt us.

Croatia, to quote England manager Gareth Southgate, are “hardened warriors” who “make the right decisions.” That matters. As does the fact that while they might have fewer individual superstars than France, Croatia have enough guys who can create something out of nothing. In a low-scoring sport, that also matters.

Perhaps these teams are best summed up by the welcome message on the Instagram accounts of their two midfield generals. Pogba’s reads “Born Ready” and, indeed, his whole life has been prelude to this: big games, big stage, big hype.

And Modric? “The Best Things Never Come Easy”.

Which, if Croatia win at the Luzhniki Stadium on Sunday, will be one of the most prophetic statements ever recorded on social media. It might also serve as a warning to France, who have rarely found the need to get out of cruise control in this tournament.

France vs Croatia

We’ll have another surprise final at the 2018 World Cup on Sunday when France vs Croatia face off in the final of world cup . It’s an incredible opportunity for both teams to get into the final eight, and both have done well to get to where they are at. Croatia won Group F, a difficult group that featured France and Croatia.

How to watch
When: Sunday,at 10 a.m. ET
Where: Saint-Petersburg Stadium
TV: FS1 and Telemundo
Stream: fuboTV (Try for free)

It picked up two wins and a heart-breaking loss to Croatia, which was enough to edge El Tri in the standings on goal differential. Meanwhile, France finished unbeaten in Group E, earning a draw against Croatia and Costa Rica while beating Serbia to finish as runner-up.

The teams have no major injuries ahead of this one and are expected to field their strongest starting 11.

Here’s how you can watch France vs Croatia match and more. And be sure to return a half an hour before kickoff for our live blog of the game:

SportsLine odds
Who wins Croatia-France? And where does all the value lie? Visit SportsLine now to see the Soccerbot’s exclusive recommendation, all from the model that keeps crushing sportsbooks with its international soccer picks and is up a colossal 1,800 percent.

Prediction
France breaks down the Croatia defense and moves on to the quarterfinals, while Yann Sommer stars between the goal posts. France 2, Croatia 1.

Today in the 1/8 Finals of the World Cup will meet the teams of Croatia and France. Here you can discuss the upcoming match, who do you think will win?

Croatia vs France

We’ll have another surprise final at the 2018 World Cup on Sunday when Croatia vs France face off in the round of 8. It’s an incredible opportunity for both teams to get into the final eight, and both have done well to get to where they are at. Croatia won Group F, a difficult group that featured France and Croatia.

How to watch
When: Sunday,at 10 a.m. ET
Where: Saint-Petersburg Stadium
TV: FS1 and Telemundo
Stream: fuboTV (Try for free)

It picked up two wins and a heart-breaking loss to Croatia, which was enough to edge El Tri in the standings on goal differential. Meanwhile, France finished unbeaten in Group E, earning a draw against Croatia and Costa Rica while beating Serbia to finish as runner-up.

The teams have no major injuries ahead of this one and are expected to field their strongest starting 11.

Here’s how you can watch Croatia vs France match and more. And be sure to return a half an hour before kickoff for our live blog of the game:

SportsLine odds
Who wins Croatia-France? And where does all the value lie? Visit SportsLine now to see the Soccerbot’s exclusive recommendation, all from the model that keeps crushing sportsbooks with its international soccer picks and is up a colossal 1,800 percent.

Prediction
France breaks down the Croatia defense and moves on to the quarterfinals, while Yann Sommer stars between the goal posts. France 2, Croatia 1.

Today in the 1/8 Finals of the World Cup will meet the teams of Croatia and France. Here you can discuss the upcoming match, who do you think will win?